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When to Plant Your Spring Garden: A Guide for Vegetables, Flowers, and Herbs





Spring is the perfect time to start your garden, but it's important to know when to plant different types of plants for optimal growth. Here's a breakdown of the best planting times for a variety of vegetables, flowers, and herbs:


Vegetables:

Cool-season vegetables such as peas, lettuce, and spinach can be planted as soon as the soil can be worked in the spring, usually around late March or early April.

Growing cool-season vegetables is a great way to extend your garden harvest and enjoy fresh produce well into the fall and winter months. Cool-season vegetables are plants that thrive in cooler temperatures, usually between 40-70°F (4-21°C). These vegetables are typically planted in early spring or late summer to early fall, depending on the variety.


Some examples of cool-season vegetables include:


Leafy Greens - such as lettuce, spinach, kale, and arugula

Cruciferous Vegetables - such as broccoli, cauliflower, and cabbage

Root Vegetables - such as carrots, turnips, beets, and radishes

Peas - such as snow peas and snap peas

Onions and Garlic - planted in the fall for a spring harvest







When planning your cool-season vegetable garden, it's important to choose varieties that are adapted to your specific growing region and to start with healthy, nutrient-rich soil. Additionally, it's important to provide adequate water and to protect your plants from frost or extreme temperatures.


Warm-season vegetables such as tomatoes, peppers, and squash should be planted after the last frost date, which varies depending on your location. In most areas, this is in late April or early May.

Root vegetables such as carrots, beets, and radishes can be planted early in the spring, but make sure the soil is dry enough to work before planting.


Flowers:

Annual flowers such as petunias, marigolds, and zinnias can be planted after the last frost date in the spring, usually in late April or early May.

Perennial flowers such as daylilies, daisies, and coneflowers should be planted in the spring or fall, depending on the specific plant and your climate.

Bulbs such as tulips, daffodils, and hyacinths should be planted in the fall for spring bloom, but can also be planted in the spring if necessary.


Cool-season flowers are a great addition to any garden as they can thrive in the cooler temperatures of spring and fall. These flowers are generally hardy and can withstand frost and other cold weather conditions. Here are some popular cool-season flowers that you can consider planting in your garden:





Pansies: Pansies are known for their cheerful faces and come in a variety of colors such as purple, yellow, orange, and blue. They bloom early in the spring and can last well into the summer if you keep them watered and fertilized.

Dianthus: Dianthus, also known as sweet William, bloom in late spring and come in shades of pink, red, and white. They are a great choice for borders and can also be used in containers.

Snapdragons: Snapdragons are known for their tall spikes of colorful flowers and come in a variety of shades such as pink, red, and white. They are great for adding height and texture to a garden and can bloom well into the fall.

Alyssum: Alyssum is a low-growing flower that produces masses of tiny blooms in shades of white, pink, and purple. They are great for filling in gaps in a garden and can also be used as a border plant.

Calendula: Calendula, also known as pot marigold, is a bright and cheerful flower that blooms in shades of orange and yellow. They are easy to grow and can be used in a variety of ways such as in borders, containers, or as a cut flower.





When planting cool-season flowers, it's important to choose a location that gets plenty of sun and has well-draining soil. You can also start seeds indoors and transplant them outside once the weather warms up.



Herbs:

Hardy herbs such as chives, thyme, and oregano can be planted as soon as the soil can be worked in the spring.

Tender herbs such as basil, cilantro, and parsley should be planted after the last frost date in the spring, usually in late April or early May.


Some additional information on cool-season herbs:


Parsley: Parsley is a biennial herb that is grown as an annual in most areas. It can be grown from seed or transplanted, and it prefers well-draining soil and full sun to partial shade. It can be harvested throughout the growing season, and it's a great addition to salads, soups, and stews.

Chives: Chives are a hardy perennial herb that grow well in cooler temperatures. They can be grown from seed or transplanted, and they prefer moist, well-draining soil and full sun to partial shade. Chives are often used in salads, soups, and as a garnish for baked potatoes.

Cilantro: Cilantro, also known as coriander, is an annual herb that thrives in cooler temperatures. It can be grown from seed or transplanted, and it prefers well-draining soil and full sun to partial shade. Cilantro is commonly used in Mexican and Asian cuisine, and it's a great addition to salsas, guacamole, and curries.

Dill: Dill is an annual herb that grows best in cooler temperatures. It can be grown from seed or transplanted, and it prefers well-draining soil and full sun to partial shade. Dill is commonly used in pickling, as well as in salads, soups, and sauces.

Mint: Mint is a hardy perennial herb that grows well in cooler temperatures. It can be grown from seed or transplanted, and it prefers moist, well-draining soil and partial shade to full sun. Mint is often used in teas, as well as in desserts and savory dishes.





Overall, cool-season herbs are a great addition to any garden. They can be grown in containers or in the ground, and they provide fresh flavor and aroma to a variety of dishes.


Remember, the timing of planting will depend on your specific location and climate. Keep an eye on the weather forecast and adjust your planting schedule accordingly. With these tips, you'll be able to start your spring garden off right and enjoy a bountiful harvest!


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